Upcoming Classes

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January 3-7, 2018 at the University of Oklahoma, Norman  3 credits

Denis Janz, Loyola University New Orleans

In the chaotic welter of events that has come to be called "the Reformation," one figure towers above all others -- Martin Luther. This seminar re-opens the long-debated question of who precisely he was. And it re-examines his legacy, particularly the dismantling of the medieval world view and the disintegration of Western Christendom.

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February 14-18, 2018 at the University of Oklahoma, Norman 3 credits

Jerrold E. Hogel, University of Arizona

In honor of the 200th anniversary of the first publication of Mary Shelley's original novel -- Frankenstein, or The Modern Prometheus  -- this seminar, starting with its students reading the original 1818 text, will explore 

  • (a) the symbolic meanings of that original version, given the wide range of cultural ingredients that went into it;
  • (b) the most influential interpretations of the novel itself since its first appearance, with some attention to what each interpreter assumes;
  • (c) some exemplary adaptations of Frankenstein on film across the 20th and 21st centuries, including why they all change the original in their own ways;
  • (d) the ongoing significance today of the issues that Frankenstein raises, from problems involving gender, race, and class to the burning questions connected right at this time to genetic engineering. 
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March 10-14, 2018 at the University of Oklahoma, Norman 3 credits

Susan D. Blum, University of Notre Dame

What is college and what is the experience of college students? How does it contribute to the development of adulthood or, possibly, to the extension of childhood? How do different types of colleges vary? Anthropologists and other social scientists have been studying higher education and its place within the lifespan, as well as its place in the cultural norms of its surrounding societies. Studies of student life, athletics, drinking, learning, social and racial inequality, and many other topics have been studied for several decades.

In this seminar we will read some of what others have written; discuss methods of analysis and research; generate our own questions; and put our own experiences into the context of the system as a whole.

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May 21-25, 2018  at the University of Oklahoma 3 credits

Guest Scholar:Gregory Cajete, University of New Mexico

Unlike the Western scientific method, Native thinking does not isolate an object or phenomenon in order to understand and work with it, but perceives it in terms of relationship. In this class we will examine multiple levels of meaning that inform Native astronomy, cosmology, psychology, agriculture, and the healing arts.

  • Enrollment through your home campus
  • OSLEP provides all required reading materials at no additional cost - NO books to buy!
  • Housing and meals provided