OKLAHOMA SCHOLAR-LEADERSHIP ENRICHMENT PROGRAM

2017-2018 Classes

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October 17-21, 2019 at University of Oklahoma  3 credits

Guest scholar:  David Ray, University of Oklahoma

This course will examine the federal budgetary process, and its evolution since 1974, with an emphasis on the rapid increase in federal debt after 1981, the struggle to reduce the budget deficit during the 1980s and 1990s, the brief four-year period of budgetary surplus (Fiscal Years 1998 through 2001) , the tax and spending decisions of 2001 through 2018, including the deficit increases produced by the tax cuts of 2001 and 2003, the recession of 2007-2009, the cost of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, the enormous expense of TARP in 2008-2009, the tax cut of December 2017, and the Omnibus spending bill passed in March 2018. The theme of the course is that fiscal conservatism has been largely supplanted by supply-side economics on the right and the domestic spending programs of social democracy on the left, both of which appear to have substantial public support. 

  • Enrollment through your home campus
  • OSLEP provides all required reading materials at no additional cost - NO books to buy!
  • Housing and meals provided
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January 2-6, 2019

Guest scholar:  Steven Jones, University of South Florida

 

How have technological changes in our culture changed the ways we think about our world and how we interact with people, data, and objects (and the networks that connect them)? Ten to fifteen years ago, according to novelist William Gibson, cyberspace everted—turned itself inside out, as the network spilled out into the physical world we move through every day. This eversion marks a major shift in the way we imagine the digital network: from a place apart to a part of the world -- from a transcendent virtual reality to a mundane mixed reality. With the eversion, it’s now taken for granted that digital data are everywhere, all around us here in the physical world. In this seminar, we’ll focus on texts, video games, and new media as examples and representations of the eversion, the new digital humanities, or both. We'll take an eclectic approach, drawing on media archaeology, cultural studies, literary criticism, and still-emerging digital humanities methods, including data analysis and visualization, locative scholarship and art, augmented reality and electronic literature, digital gaming, and 3D printing.

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  • Enrollment through your home campus
  • OSLEP provides all required reading materials at no additional cost - NO books to buy!
  • Housing and meals provided
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February 14-18, 2019 at the University of Oklahoma  3 credits

Guest scholar:  Julie Guthman, University of California, Santa Cruz

The United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization estimates that about 795 million people of the 7.3 billion people in the world, or one in nine, were suffering from chronic undernourishment in 2014-2016. According to the United States Department of Agriculture, 41.2 million Americans lived in food-insecure households in 2016. These are startling statistics, but what do they mean?  And why does hunger persist despite manifold efforts to eliminate it?  In this course we will first discuss how hunger has been defined, measured, and problematized. We will then turn to examining four different approaches to addressing the problem, in the US and elsewhere, in order to reach greater understanding of how “feeding the world” remains such an elusive goal.

  • Enrollment through your home campus
  • OSLEP provides all required reading materials at no additional cost - NO books to buy!
  • Housing and meals provided
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March 9-13, 2019 at the University of Oklahoma  3 credits

Guest Scholar:  Monti Narayan Datta, University of Richmond

After the terrorist attacks against the United States on September 11th 2001, policy makers, scholars, and the media scrambled to understand the nature and origins of anti-American sentiment. Why would others want to hurt the United States in such a violent and destructive manner? Why did the United States not fully appreciate that such an attack might result from anti-American sentiment? More fundamentally, what is anti-Americanism and how can we measure it? In this course we will: (1) define what it means to be “American” and “anti-American;” (2) examine survey data and reports from the Pew Research Center’s Global Attitudes Project on foreign public perceptions toward the United States from 2001 to the present; (3) assess some of the best scholarship to date on anti-Americanism; and (4) consider the case of domestic antiAmericanism, with an eye toward understanding the roots of the Oklahoma city bombing in 1995 in addition to other local anti-American movements over the past decade. 

  • Enrollment through your home campus
  • OSLEP provides all required reading materials at no additional cost - NO books to buy!
  • Housing and meals provided

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