Previous Classes

to

October 2-6, 2019 

University of Oklahoma   3 credits

Guest Scholar: Kim Rice, Independent Scholar, Baltimore, MD.

We are living in a politically charged era. From the election of polarizing leaders, the widening of financial inequality, the death of unarmed citizens at the hands of police, to natural disasters fueled by climate change. There are many groups rising up to face the challenges of our century and artists are no exception. In this course we will explore how artists are using their platform to create social change. We will address the following questions: How is contemporary art defined? How have artists played a role in peoples’ movements historically? What is the role of the museum and social media in art making?  How are artists collaborating with urban planners, architects, environmentalists and non-profits to create social change?

 

Kim Rice creates large-scale works using common materials. Her installations are a meditation on institutional racism and the policies that continue to affect American society today.  Kim earned her BFA in Sculpture and MFA in Printmaking from the University of Oklahoma. Her work has been shown throughout the country including the 22ndNo Dead Artists at Jonathan Ferrara Gallery, Prospect.4 Satellite, Alexandria Museum of Art, Fred Jones Museum of Art, Northern Illinois Art Museum, and the Delaware Museum of Art. She has received multiple awards, including the McNeese Grant for Socially Engaged Practice.  Born in Kentucky, raised in California, educated in Oklahoma, loved in New Orleans and now home in Baltimore, Kim’s work is influenced by her two children and the pile of books by her bed.

 

  • Enrollment through your home campus
  • OSLEP provides all required reading materials at no additional cost - NO books to buy!
  • Housing and meals provided
to

May 13-19, 2019

Santa Fe, NM

Guest Scholar:  Sam Duwe, University of Oklahoma

Few people have captured the imagination of both anthropologists and the public more than the Pueblo Indians of the American Southwest. Pueblo history is very ancient, and traces of this dynamic past are recorded amongst ancestral villages that have long fascinated archaeologists. With the arrival of the Spanish, the Pueblos were the vanguard of European colonialism, both resisting and adapting to new realities. And the Pueblos have managed to continue to occupy the same land as their ancestors in the face of colonial policy to the present day, with many villages continually occupied for the past 700 years. In this course we will explore both continuities and change in Pueblo history, with the understanding that the same philosophical and cultural concepts that guided the actions of Pueblo people in the past continue into the present, and the future. We’ll focus on the Pueblos of northern New Mexico and will visit archaeological and historic sites, Pueblo communities, and places of great natural beauty and cultural significance. As with all OSLEP seminars, all costs for participating other than tuition (including travel, food, housing, and books) will be paid for by the OSLEP program.

 

Since 2000, Sam Duwe ( University of Oklahoma) has been studying the history of the Pueblo people of the American Southwest, especially to explore the roots of contemporary Tewa peoples’ worldview and identity. His work integrates archaeology, oral history, and ethnography to understand the deep history of the people in the northern Rio Grande region. On the travel portion of this seminar, Sam and local specialists will introduce students to the cultures, history, and places that make this region unique.

  • Enrollment through your home campus.
  • OSLEP provides all required reading materials at no additional cost- NO books to buy!
  • Housing and meals provided.  Travel from Norman, OK to Santa Fe, NM provided.
  • Go to oslep.org to apply

 

to

March 9-13, 2019 at the University of Oklahoma  3 credits

Guest Scholar:  Monti Narayan Datta, University of Richmond

After the terrorist attacks against the United States on September 11th 2001, policy makers, scholars, and the media scrambled to understand the nature and origins of anti-American sentiment. Why would others want to hurt the United States in such a violent and destructive manner? Why did the United States not fully appreciate that such an attack might result from anti-American sentiment? More fundamentally, what is anti-Americanism and how can we measure it? In this course we will: (1) define what it means to be “American” and “anti-American;” (2) examine survey data and reports from the Pew Research Center’s Global Attitudes Project on foreign public perceptions toward the United States from 2001 to the present; (3) assess some of the best scholarship to date on anti-Americanism; and (4) consider the case of domestic antiAmericanism, with an eye toward understanding the roots of the Oklahoma city bombing in 1995 in addition to other local anti-American movements over the past decade. 

  • Enrollment through your home campus
  • OSLEP provides all required reading materials at no additional cost - NO books to buy!
  • Housing and meals provided
to

February 14-18, 2019 at the University of Oklahoma  3 credits

Guest scholar:  Julie Guthman, University of California, Santa Cruz

The United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization estimates that about 795 million people of the 7.3 billion people in the world, or one in nine, were suffering from chronic undernourishment in 2014-2016. According to the United States Department of Agriculture, 41.2 million Americans lived in food-insecure households in 2016. These are startling statistics, but what do they mean?  And why does hunger persist despite manifold efforts to eliminate it?  In this course we will first discuss how hunger has been defined, measured, and problematized. We will then turn to examining four different approaches to addressing the problem, in the US and elsewhere, in order to reach greater understanding of how “feeding the world” remains such an elusive goal.

  • Enrollment through your home campus
  • OSLEP provides all required reading materials at no additional cost - NO books to buy!
  • Housing and meals provided
to

January 2-6, 2019

Guest scholar:  Steven Jones, University of South Florida

 

How have technological changes changed the ways we think about our world and how we interact with people, data, and objects (and the networks that connect them)? Ten to fifteen years ago, according to novelist William Gibson, cyberspace everted—turned itself inside out, as the network spilled out into the physical world we move through every day. Increasingly ubiquitous technologies—smartphones, the so-called Internet of Things, Augmented Reality, 3D printing, cryptocurrency, and Artificial Intelligence—have colonized the world of everyday experience. In this seminar, we’ll focus on some of the cultural, political, and ethical questions raised by that shift, questions about security, privacy, community, and what it means to be human.    

 

  • Enrollment through your home campus
  • OSLEP provides all required reading materials at no additional cost - NO books to buy!
  • Housing and meals provided
to

October 17-21, 2018 at University of Oklahoma  3 credits

Guest scholar:  David Ray, University of Oklahoma

This course will examine the federal budgetary process, and its evolution since 1974, with an emphasis on the rapid increase in federal debt after 1981, the struggle to reduce the budget deficit during the 1980s and 1990s, the brief four-year period of budgetary surplus (Fiscal Years 1998 through 2001) , the tax and spending decisions of 2001 through 2018, including the deficit increases produced by the tax cuts of 2001 and 2003, the recession of 2007-2009, the cost of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, the enormous expense of TARP in 2008-2009, the tax cut of December 2017, and the Omnibus spending bill passed in March 2018. The theme of the course is that fiscal conservatism has been largely supplanted by supply-side economics on the right and the domestic spending programs of social democracy on the left, both of which appear to have substantial public support. 

  • Enrollment through your home campus
  • OSLEP provides all required reading materials at no additional cost - NO books to buy!
  • Housing and meals provided
to

May 21-25, 2018  at the University of Oklahoma 3 credits

Guest Scholar:Gregory Cajete, University of New Mexico

Unlike the Western scientific method, Native thinking does not isolate an object or phenomenon in order to understand and work with it, but perceives it in terms of relationship. In this class we will examine multiple levels of meaning that inform Native astronomy, cosmology, psychology, agriculture, and the healing arts.

  • Enrollment through your home campus
  • OSLEP provides all required reading materials at no additional cost - NO books to buy!
  • Housing and meals provided
to

March 10-14, 2018 at the University of Oklahoma, Norman 3 credits

Susan D. Blum, University of Notre Dame

What is college and what is the experience of college students? How does it contribute to the development of adulthood or, possibly, to the extension of childhood? How do different types of colleges vary? Anthropologists and other social scientists have been studying higher education and its place within the lifespan, as well as its place in the cultural norms of its surrounding societies. Studies of student life, athletics, drinking, learning, social and racial inequality, and many other topics have been studied for several decades.

In this seminar we will read some of what others have written; discuss methods of analysis and research; generate our own questions; and put our own experiences into the context of the system as a whole.

to

February 14-18, 2018 at the University of Oklahoma, Norman 3 credits

Jerrold E. Hogel, University of Arizona

In honor of the 200th anniversary of the first publication of Mary Shelley's original novel -- Frankenstein, or The Modern Prometheus  -- this seminar, starting with its students reading the original 1818 text, will explore 

  • (a) the symbolic meanings of that original version, given the wide range of cultural ingredients that went into it;
  • (b) the most influential interpretations of the novel itself since its first appearance, with some attention to what each interpreter assumes;
  • (c) some exemplary adaptations of Frankenstein on film across the 20th and 21st centuries, including why they all change the original in their own ways;
  • (d) the ongoing significance today of the issues that Frankenstein raises, from problems involving gender, race, and class to the burning questions connected right at this time to genetic engineering. 
to

January 3-7, 2018 at the University of Oklahoma, Norman  3 credits

Denis Janz, Loyola University New Orleans

In the chaotic welter of events that has come to be called "the Reformation," one figure towers above all others -- Martin Luther. This seminar re-opens the long-debated question of who precisely he was. And it re-examines his legacy, particularly the dismantling of the medieval world view and the disintegration of Western Christendom.